beckylucyfoster
beckylucyfoster:

fiona banner - don’t look back
‘Don’t Look Back is a text work, consisting of three large panels of dense black capitalised text on silver paper pasted directly on the wall. It is based on D.A. Pennebaker’s celebrated rockumentary film Don’t Look Back, 1967, about American singer Bob Dylan’s first British tour in 1965. Banner decided to make the work when she discovered the film was not available on video. She wrote three narrative accounts of the film from memory, placing each on a separate panel. Although all three panels look identical from a distance, each has a different content. The first sentence of each account describes the film’s opening scene in which Dylan stands in a street holding up placards that refer to the lyrics of his song ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’, 1965, while it plays on the soundtrack. One panel emphasises the lyrics, another focuses on the placards which he discards after the lyric has been sung and the last concentrates on the run-down street scene. As the narrative progress the panels recount different aspects of the film, as though it is a story being told from three different points of view. Each panel is written in the first person present tense giving the impression of an eye witness account of events which the narrator experienced.’
(summary from www.tate.org.uk)

beckylucyfoster:

fiona banner - don’t look back

‘Don’t Look Back is a text work, consisting of three large panels of dense black capitalised text on silver paper pasted directly on the wall. It is based on D.A. Pennebaker’s celebrated rockumentary film Don’t Look Back, 1967, about American singer Bob Dylan’s first British tour in 1965. Banner decided to make the work when she discovered the film was not available on video. She wrote three narrative accounts of the film from memory, placing each on a separate panel. Although all three panels look identical from a distance, each has a different content. The first sentence of each account describes the film’s opening scene in which Dylan stands in a street holding up placards that refer to the lyrics of his song ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’, 1965, while it plays on the soundtrack. One panel emphasises the lyrics, another focuses on the placards which he discards after the lyric has been sung and the last concentrates on the run-down street scene. As the narrative progress the panels recount different aspects of the film, as though it is a story being told from three different points of view. Each panel is written in the first person present tense giving the impression of an eye witness account of events which the narrator experienced.’

(summary from www.tate.org.uk)